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Arbitrator disagrees that grievor’s interference with air quality test was a deliberate act of sabotage and replaces termination with a lengthy suspension

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In this recent Alberta arbitration case, the employer had been dealing with safety issues involving excessive carbon monoxide levels. Carbon monoxide readings in the employer’s facility were often beyond the regulatory levels and the employer had taken several steps to try to reduce them. The City of Calgary ultimately issued an order requiring the employer to either reduce the levels or face a potential plant closure.  The employer hired a consultant to perform the necessary testing. A two day test was set up that involved setting up stationary air quality monitors in the facility, as well as having individuals carry personal air quality monitors while they went about their daily work routine.

On the first day of the test, the grievor was seen moving one of the stationary monitors. When confronted, he replied that he had switched his personal monitor for the stationary one so that the test would take into account his personal exposure. He acknowledged that he did this without authorization. The employer treated this as a serious safety risk as he tampered with the testing process. He had also previously interfered with an air quality test. The employer considered his conduct to be a violation of the company’s safety responsibilities and of its Vision, Mission, Values and Objectives policy. The employer took the position that the grievor had fundamentally breached the trust relationship between them and terminated his employment. The union grieved the termination.

The arbitrator found that the evidence established that the employer was committed to resolving the air quality issue. However, he did not accept that the grievor’s conduct was an act of  sabotage and noted that the grievor’s conduct did not create a safety violation or threat. Nevertheless, the arbitrator acknowledged that the grievor had interfered with a planned scientific test, potentially corrupting its results, and that his conduct warranted discipline. The question was whether termination was appropriate.

The arbitrator noted that the employer’s policies required employees to be vigilant in ensuring safety. The evidence also established that another employee had previously removed a monitor without authorization but was not disciplined. The arbitrator also considered that the grievor had not been made aware of the potential consequences of his actions before he moved the monitor and when he appreciated the implications of what he had done, he admitted his mistake and apologized. Ultimately, the arbitrator held that the employer had not established that the grievor had deliberately tried to sabotaged the tests. What the evidence did establish is that the grievor knew, or ought to have known, the significance of moving the monitor without authority. This conduct was serious and was deserving of appropriate discipline which took into account two previous disciplinary offences.

After reviewing all of the circumstances, the arbitrator  allowed the grievance as he was not persuaded that the employment relationship had been irretrievably severed. He substituted a lengthy, 90 day, suspension, without pay, for the termination.

Cement, Lime, Gypsum And Allied Workers (International Brotherhood Of Boilermakers, Iron Ship Builders, Blacksmiths, Forgers And Helpers, Local Lodge D345) v Certainteed Gypsum Canada Inc., 2017 CanLII 10827 (AB GAA)